Multicolored Tanager pair. For The Institute for Bird Populations' BirdPop! blog.

California Condor nesting in burned Giant Sequoia, for The Institute for Bird Populations (in press)

Hermit Warbler male with geolocator. For Hankyu Kim's work on HEWA migratory connectivity.

Lekking Gunnison Sage-Grouse. For The Institute for Bird Populations 2021 Annual Report.

Red-eyed Vireo. For Casey Youngflesh and Morgan Tingley, paper forthcoming.

Northern Parula. For Casey Youngflesh and Morgan Tingley, paper forthcoming.

An Archaeopteryx glides through a ginkgo woodland. This individual is molting its feathers in a sequence similar to most modern birds. From the Bird Pop! blog at https://birdpop.org/pages/blogPost.php?id=77.

Singing Blackburnian Warbler, for Rob Porter's podcast Songbirding.

Klamath National Forest: Goosenest District species. For The Institute for Bird Populations annual report, 2020.

Black-backed Woodpecker as the Phoenix of California's wildfires. For The Institute for Bird Populations annual report, 2020.

White-crowned Sparrow on Peter Pyle's Identification Guide to North American Birds, for The Institute for Bird Populations' 2020 Annual Report. The guide is getting updated to a second edition and I'm so pleased to be part of the team working on the updates!

Mariana Kingfisher, for The Institute for Bird Populations.

Micronesian Myzomela, for The Institute for Bird Populations.

Figure illustrating potential sex differences in Cooper's Hawks.

Common songbirds of Saipan, for The Institute for Bird Populations.

Illustrations for Pyle et al. 2018. Evidence of widespread movements from breeding to molting grounds by North American landbirds. The Auk: Ornithological Advances 135:506-520.

Hammond’s Flycatcher, for Saracco et al. 2019. Phenology and productivity in a montane bird assemblage: Trends and responses to elevation and climate variation. Poster presented at the 2019 American Ornithological Society meeting.

Sierra Nevada wood boring beetles, for The Institute for Bird Populations

Bats of Plumas National Forest, for Blakey et al. 2019. Bats in a changing landscape: Linking occupancy and traits of a diverse montane bat community to fire regime. Ecology and Evolution 2019:1-14

Sierra Nevada bumble bees, for The Institute for Bird Populations

Cypriacis aurulenta (Golden buprestid beetle) for The Institute for Bird Populations annual report 2016 – the most commonly-captured beetle in burned forests sampled by the Sierra Nevada Observatory research team.

Scientific Art and Illustration

Illustrations mostly of birds, dinosaurs, and others, for The Institute for Bird Populations as well as for my own projects.